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Christie’s Rare T. Rex auction could smash sales records



The Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton named Stan.

The Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton named Stan.
image:: Christie’s

On October 6th, Christie’s is auctioning Stan – one of the most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex Skeletons ever found. The skeleton could fetch a record price at auction, with estimates of up to $ 8 million.

At 3.9 meters high and nearly 12 meters long, Stan would be a spectacular addition to any wealthy museum. A more disgusting way would be to see Skeleton Land in a wealthy Rando’s private collection, never to see it in public again. But those are the possibilities while Christie’s prepares to auction the impressive specimen while his 20th century evening sales Event in New York City.

“It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to get one T-rex as complete as that, ”said James Hyslop, director of science and natural history at Christie. told AFP.

Stan's massive skull is so heavy that a replica is used when the entire fossil is on display, while the original head is kept in a display case for viewing.

Stan’s massive skull is so heavy that a replica is used when the entire fossil is on display, while the original head is kept in a display case for viewing.
image:: Christie’s

The skeleton, officially dubbed BHI 3033, is expected to make between $ 6 million and $ 8 million, and possibly more. The current price record for a T-rex Skeleton belongs to Sue that sold for $8.36 million to the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago in 1997. It is possible that the almost equally formidable Stan (Sue is taller and slightly more complete) can be sold for more because he is “one of the most complete fossil skeletons one of the most famous species of dinosaur to have ever lived, ”said Christie’s explained on his website.

Stan is named after Stan Sacrison, an amateur paleontologist who discovered the skeleton in 1987 private land near Buffalo, South Dakota. The bones were drawn from the Hell Creek Formation, which is known for producing dinosaur fossils. The skeleton dates from the late Cretaceous period around 66 to 67 million years ago.

One of many Stan replicas made over the years.  This is located in the rotunda of the State Capitol in Pierre, South Dakota.

One of many Stan replicas made over the years. This is located in the rotunda of the State Capitol in Pierre, South Dakota.
image:: Doug Dreyer (AP)

According to Christie’s, it took 30,000 man hours to dig up the fossil and put it back together. Paleontologists from the Black Hills Geological Research Institute performed this work, which began in 1992 and took three years to complete, reports AFP.

The skeleton was later exhibited at the Black Hills Institute in Hill City, but these bones have contributed to some very serious scientific work over the years. In 2005 a replica of the skull was made shown exert a biting force of four tons per square inch that a car could easily crush. research from 2012 suggests that this carnivorous dinosaur’s front teeth were designed to be grasped and pulled, the posterior teeth were built to tear meat, and the rear teeth sliced ​​pieces of meat to prepare for swallowing. In addition, punctures in the skull and fused cervical vertebrae suggest that Stan, a man who died around the age of 20, survived attacks from members of his own species.

As AFP reports, around 50 skeletons are from T. rexes have been found since 1902, with almost complete skeletons being rare. Should Stan be sold to an anonymous millionaire and never be seen again, it would be tragic, but not a complete catastrophe. to date, the Black Hills Institute – a profit-oriented Fossil Company – has sold dozens of Stan replicas to museums around the world calculation $ 100,000.

Stan will be on public display in Christie’s flagship in Rockefeller Center in New York City through October 21st. The skeleton can be seen through the window. So you should check it out now before it might go away forever. We hope that Stan will be sold to an established museum and displayed for all to see. Seriously, such unique finds should automatically be publicized.


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