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Researchers for heart damage after COVID alert researchers



Shelby Hedgecock contracted coronavirus in April and thought she’d gotten through the worst – the severe headache, severe gastrointestinal distress, and debilitating fatigue – but she was wrong.

She started having chest pains and a pounding heartbeat early last month. Her doctor placed her on a heart monitor and ordered blood tests that indicated the previously healthy 29-year-old had suffered heart damage, likely due to her battle with COVID-19.

“I never thought that I would have to worry about a heart attack when I was 29,” Ms. Hedgecock told Yahoo News in the US.

“Before COVID-19, I had no complications – no pre-existing diseases, no heart problems. I can deal with the fact that my taste and smell are boring, I can defend myself against the debilitating tiredness, but your heart has to hold you really long. “

Shelby Hedgecock, 29, has suffered heart damage after a bout of COVID-19. Source: Supplied

Ms. Hedgecock’s doctor referred her to a cardiologist, whom she will see this week when the heart monitor found that her pulse rate is very irregular, between 49 and 189 beats per minute. She has raised inflammation markers and platelet counts.

Ms. Hedgecock is a former personal trainer who is out of breath from walking around the room. She is worried about the future.

She is far from being alone in her struggle. Dr. Ossama Samuel is a cardiologist at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital, where he routinely sees coronavirus survivors struggling with heart complications.

Dr. Samuel said his team treated three young and otherwise healthy coronavirus patients who developed myocarditis – an inflammation of the heart muscle – weeks to months after recovering from the virus.

Myocarditis especially harmful to athletes

Myocarditis can affect the way the heart pumps blood, causing rapid or abnormal heart rhythms. It’s especially dangerous for athletes, doctors say, because it goes undetected and can lead to a heart attack if you do strenuous exercise.

In recent weeks, some university athletes have reported heart complications from the coronavirus, which underscores the severity of the disease.

diedfrom a heart attack in Serbia. He had recovered from coronavirus before collapsing on the basketball court. “Data-reactid =” 43 “> Last month, professional basketball player and former Florida state star Michael Ojo died of a heart attack in Serbia after he had collapsed on the basketball court before recovering from the coronavirus.

died from a heart attack in Serbia. Source: Getty “data-reactid =” 60 “>

Former Florida state star Michael Ojo died of a heart attack in Serbia. Source: Getty

foundthat between 10 and 13 percent of university athletes who had recovered from COVID-19 had myocarditis. When the Big Ten Sports Conference announced the cancellation of their season last month, Commissioner Kevin Warren announcedquotedthe risk of heart failure in athletes. “data-reactid =” 64 “> An Ohio State University cardiologist found that between 10 and 13 percent of university athletes who had recovered from COVID-19 had myocarditis, as the Big Ten Sports Conference announced at the Cancellation of his season last month pointed Commissioner Kevin Warren to the risk of heart failure in athletes.

Researchers have estimated that up to 20 percent of people who get the coronavirus will experience heart damage.

Dr. Samuel said he felt a duty to warn people, especially since some of the patients he and his colleagues saw from Mount Sinai with myocarditis had only mild cases of the coronavirus months ago.

“We are now seeing people with pericarditis three months after COVID [inflammation of the sac around the heart] or myocarditis, ”he said.

Dr. Samuel said he believes a small fraction of coronavirus survivors will suffer heart damage, “but when a disease is so widespread it is worrying that a small fraction is still sizeable.”

Dr. Samuel said he is particularly concerned about athletes who participate in team sports as many live together and spend time in confined spaces. Teammates can all get the coronavirus and recover together, Samuel said, but “the one who really gets this crazy myocarditis could be at risk of dying from exercise or exercise.”

“It’s a concern about what you do: should we do sports in general, should we do it in schools, should we do it in college, should we only do it for professionals who understand the risk and get paid for it?” he asked himself. “I hope we don’t scare the public, but we should make people aware of it.”

Dr. Samuel recommends that patients recovering from COVID-19 with myocarditis avoid exercising for three to six months.

Doctors find “surprisingly high” effects on the heart

reportedthat an 11-year-old child had died of myocarditis and heart failure after an attack of COVID-induced multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). An autopsy revealed that the coronavirus was embedded in the child’s heart tissue. “data-reactid =” 81 “> The medical journal Lancet recently reported that an 11-year-old child had died of myocarditis and heart failure after an attack of COVID-induced multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). An autopsy revealed coronavirus in heart tissue of the child embedded.

found78 percent of patients who recovered from the coronavirus and had mild to moderate symptoms from illness had signs of cardiac involvement on MRIs done more than two months after their initial infection. “data-reactid =” 82 “> A recent study from Germany found that 78 percent of patients who had recovered from the coronavirus and had only mild to moderate symptoms while contracting the disease indicated that they were involved in cardiac MRI that were done more than twice months after their first infection.

Senior investigator Eike Nagel said it was worrying to see such widespread effects on the heart. Persistent myocarditis developed in six out of ten nail patients examined.

COVID-19 attacks the heart muscle and causes it to become inflamed. This can lead to a heart attack. Source: Getty

“About two months after the COVID infection, we noticed a surprisingly high level of heart involvement,” Nagel said in an email. “These changes are much milder than in patients with severe acute myocarditis.”

The magnitude of the cardiac effects on relatively healthy young patients surprised many doctors. Mr Nagel said the results are significant “on a population basis” and that the effects of COVID-19 on the heart need further study.

newsroomau@yahoonews.com.“data-reactid =” 107 “>Do you have a story tip? E-mail: newsroomau@yahoonews.com.

Facebook,InstagramandTwitterand download the Yahoo News app from theAppstore orGoogle play.“data-reactid =” 108 “>You can also follow us Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and download the Yahoo News app from the Appstore or Google play.




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