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The mother reveals that the newborn almost died after the doctor missed the deadly Group B strep infection



A mother who claims to have been instructed by a doctor to treat her sick newborn baby with Calpol has revealed that ignoring his advice saved her from a fatal infection that would have killed her an hour later.

Hartlepool, 35, Victoria Auton felt strongly that something was wrong with her little girl, despite her family doctor telling her there was nothing to worry about.

The mother of two noticed Lexie was hot and pale looking and took her to A&E just in time.

Lexie was given oxygen immediately and was later diagnosed with Group B Streptococcus meningitis (GBS), a fatal infection that was transmitted during pregnancy.

Victoria Auton, 35, of Hartlepool, pictured with husband Robbie and their two children, said ignoring her doctor's advice saved her little girl's life

Victoria Auton, 35, of Hartlepool, pictured with husband Robbie and their two children, said ignoring her doctor’s advice saved her little girl’s life

Lexie is now healthy and thriving at home after months of physical therapy and specialized treatment to combat the brain damage she sustained as a result of the infection.

Victoria, an office manager and photographer, said, “The doctor told me she was an hour before death. If we had gone back to bed, she would have been dead in the morning. ‘

Having previously had difficulty conceiving naturally and having their first child through IVF, Lexie was a “dream baby” for Victoria and husband Robbie, 40, and was born on February 15 at a healthy weight of 7 pounds 1 ounce .

But just three weeks later, Victoria noticed signs that something was wrong when Lexie got a high temperature.

“I took her to the doctor, but he told me it was just a viral infection and he told me to give her Calpol,” Victoria said.

Victoria, mother of two, felt strongly that something was wrong with her little girl, despite her family doctor telling her there was nothing to worry about.  The mom of two noticed Lexie (pictured) had a high temperature and looked pale and took her to A&E just in time.

Victoria, mother of two, felt strongly that something was wrong with her little girl, despite her family doctor telling her there was nothing to worry about. The mom of two noticed Lexie (pictured) had a high temperature and looked pale and took her to A&E just in time.

Victoria and Robbie, a corrugated board manager, stayed up all night to keep an eye on Lexie.

“I went downstairs at three-thirty and cuddled her,” Victoria recalled. “It looked worse, it was pale in color and it was still very hot.”

I woke Robbie and we rushed to North Tees Hospital. We arrived and then suddenly 10 people rushed into the room we were in and put an oxygen mask on Lexie. I cried my eyes. ‘

At first, the doctors didn’t know what was wrong with the newborn, but later diagnosed her with Group B Streptococcus meningitis.

Victoria said, “I was devastated, my world collapsed.”

Lexie had very high infection rates and had seizures.

Having previously had difficulty conceiving naturally and having their first child through IVF, Lexie was a

Having previously had difficulty conceiving naturally and having their first child through IVF, Lexie was a “dream baby” for Victoria (pictured) and husband Robbie, 40, and was born on February 15 at a healthy weight of 7 Born pound 1 ounce. But just three weeks later Victoria noticed signs that something was wrong when Lexie got a high temperature

“Suddenly her hand started knocking and I immediately hit the alarm,” Victoria recalled.

The doctors stormed back in and watched Lexie have a seizure but take no action. They told me there was nothing they could do but watch them. I screamed “do something” but they couldn’t. ‘

Lexie had two more seizures and had to be taken to the Royal Victoria Infirmity in Newcastle for an MRI and possible surgery on her brain as her condition worsened.

Lexie spent five weeks at North Tees Hospital in Stockton-on-Tees while her infection rates were falling.

In the end, Lexie didn’t need brain surgery, but the family was told that she had brain damage due to the oxygen levels.

Victoria said, “They told me that she may never move her arms properly, speak, smile, or even look at me.

Lexie spent five weeks at North Tees Hospital in Stockton-on-Tees while her infection rates were falling.  In the end, Lexie didn't need brain surgery, but the family was told she had brain damage due to the oxygen levels - but Victoria said her little girl (pictured recently) made massive improvements

Lexie spent five weeks at North Tees Hospital in Stockton-on-Tees while her infection rates were falling. In the end, Lexie didn’t need brain surgery, but the family was told she had brain damage due to the oxygen levels – but Victoria said her little girl (pictured recently) made massive improvements

“But they didn’t know how badly they would be affected, and I could just wait and see.”

Determined that Lexie wouldn’t suffer, Victoria scoured the Internet for early intervention treatment and signed up for therapy and physical therapy.

She said, “As soon as we got home, we noticed signs of brain damage. She wouldn’t move her arm properly or roll around merrily. ‘

After months of exercise and a technique called neuroplasticity, a process of repairing and rewiring the brain, seven-month-old Lexie has made massive improvements and is a “miracle” according to her doctors and mother.

“You wouldn’t know anything happened to her if she was advanced for her age,” Victoria said.

She crawls around, sits up, flips through the pages of her book and even tries to get up. It’s unreal for her age. It’s amazing, she’s a miracle. ‘

WHAT IS A GROUP STREP B INFECTION?

Group B streptococci (GBS) are bacteria that are transmitted, usually in the intestines, by up to 40 percent of adults and 25 percent of women in their vagina without typically causing symptoms.

According to the NHS, 1 in 2,000 babies will be diagnosed with infection. It kills around 10 percent of the time.

The rate of GBS infection in newborns in the UK is 2.5 times that in the US.

GBS infections usually affect newborns, occasionally adults, and very rarely babies during pregnancy and before birth.

Infants can have early-onset GBS infections, which are much more common and occur after the child is up to six days old, when exposed to the bacteria in the womb or during delivery.

This leads to them developing rapid breathing problems and blood poisoning.

Late-onset GBS infections, which occur between seven days and up to three months, usually cause sepsis and meningitis.

Baby symptoms include:

  • fever
  • Bluish colored skin
  • Seizures
  • Limpness or stiffness
  • Vomit
  • Bad feeding
  • diarrhea
  • Fuss

Infections can occur in adults:

  • Skin and soft tissues
  • Bones and joints
  • lung
  • Urinary tract

GBS infections are linked to stillbirth, premature birth, and maternal infections.

Treatment for patients of all ages is IV antibiotics.

Source: Strep-Support of Group B.


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